Sunday, May 19

Please note: due to space limitations, you must pre-register for some Saturday sessions and all Friday pre-conference sessions. You will not need to pre-register for any Sunday sessions.

 

Being an Ambassador to Aquatic Invasive Speices Prevention 

8:00–10:45 am
Gallery 6
Travis Kinsell

The purpose of Minnesota DNR's AIS Ambassador and Volunteer Program is to teach people how to educate the public about aquatic invasive species (AIS). You will learn how to teach people about invasive species such as Eurasian watermilfoil, zebra mussels, spiny waterflea, and others that can invade our water bodies. You will learn how to talk to boaters about how to comply with Minnesota laws regarding invasive species and help people understand the necessary steps and places to look on their boat and trailer for invasive species. This workshop also includes some hands-on time in the parking lot practicing your new skills on a boat! Additional paperwork will be required if after this training, it you'd like to sign up to become an active volunteer for the DNR (necessary paperwork will be provided).

Experience Level: Beginner
Activity Level: Moderately active

 

SciArt And A Hands On Paper-making Workshop Using Native and Invasive Plants!

8:00–9:30 am
Gallery 3
Don Sherman

We will cover some processes, history and applications of hand-made paper in a new way to appreciate our prairie’s structure and beauty and de-segregate conditions holding arts and sciences apart. Participants can discuss how the roles of art and science can come together and glimpse profound work being done by collaborating artists and scientists. Supplies will be on hand so each person can make and take a paper-piece derived from local plants using some new photo-optical equipment, a deckle, a press, couching-material, and a dryer. This is meant to be a fun workshop for all levels.

Experience Level: Intermediate
Activity Level: Moderately active

 

Lake Superior Storms

8:00–9:30 am
Gallery 5
Phil Hartley

A brief historical look at the causes and consequences of some of the most dangerous storms on Lake Superior. Followed by personal photos, taken over the last 15 years, starting in Duluth's Canal Park and going all the way up to Grand Marais, of significant "nor'easters'' experienced by the presenter. You don't chase a Lake Superior Storm--it comes to you.

Experience Level: Intermediate
Activity Level: Inactive

 

Teaching in the Outdoors

8:00–9:30 am
Gallery 2
Stephan Carlson

If you’ve ever lead a hike or taught an outdoor lesson, then you know outdoor settings are very different from indoor classrooms. This session will explore the skills needed to deliver engaging educational and recreational outdoor programs. Participants will learn a set of principles that help guide planning and leading groups outdoors with hands-on programs made simple so anyone can be successful. Plan to venture outdoors to put the principles into action!

Experience Level: Beginner
Activity Level: Moderately active

 

Minnesota Biodiversity Atlas Workshop for Outreach, Education, & Research

8:00–9:30 am
Gallery 4
George Weiblen

The Minnesota Biodiversity Atlas (http:bellatlas.umn.edu) is an online digital resource offering public access to records of plants, animals and fungi. Developed with support from the Environment & Natural Resources Trust Fund, the Atlas houses over 5 terabytes of data from the scientific collections of the Bell Museum, including more than 16,000 species, 670,000 records, and 300,000 digital images. The museum recently launched phase two of the project. The goal of this phase is adding biodiversity records from other academic institutions and natural resource agencies across the state to more than double the size of the Atlas. This session will demonstrate how naturalists can (1) use the Biodiversity Atlas to obtain data, (2) create regional maps of biodiversity, and (3) develop area-specific checklists for interpretation and educational programming.

Experience Level: Beginner
Activity Level: A little bit active

 

Photographing Wildflowers

8:00–9:30 am
Gallery 1
Mark Bergman

Did you ever wonder how those beautiful wildflower photographs were taken? This session will explore the equipment and techniques that will lead to pleasing photographs from a technical and artistic perspective. We'll discus a number of photograph examples, and, if time permits, we'll try our learned skills on real world photography with your camera. Participants are encouraged to bring their own camera and accessories (lenses, tripod, camera manual).

Experience Level: Beginner
Activity Level: Moderately active

 

Commemorating 50 Years of the Scientific and Natural Areas Program

9:45–10:45 am
Gallery 1
Kelly Randall & Judy Schulte

On May 16, 1969 legislation passed creating the foundation of a program designed to preserve the best examples of Minnesota’s natural features and rare species. Fast forward, and 2019 marks the Scientific and Natural Areas Program 50th anniversary. Much has changed over 50 years, yet the vision for SNAs remains true: “A state scientific and natural area shall be established to protect and perpetuate in an undisturbed natural state those natural features which possess exceptional scientific or educational value.” Join in this session to find out how the Program has changed, yet stayed true to its roots.

Experience Level: Intermediate
Activity Level: Inactive

 

Hybrid Invasive Plants Produce Novel Threats

9:45–10:45 am
Gallery 5
Mari Hardel & Monika Chandler

Barberry, knapweed, knotweed and toadflax hybrids have been documented, however impacts and threats that these hybrid species pose have not been fully assessed. Will they invade a wider variety of habitats? Will they respond differently to herbicide treatments? What diseases might they host? Are there added means of reproduction? We will look at where these hybrids have been documented, the difficulties in identification and the impacts they may have.

Experience Level: Intermediate
Activity Level: Inactive

 

Food Forests - Building Edible Community Landscapes

9:45–10:45 am
Gallery 3
Gary Wyatt & Diomy Zamora

People are familiar with community gardens but have you heard of community food forests? A food forest combines trees, shrubs, vines, perennials and self-seeding annuals to produce vegetables, fruits and nuts. Rather than individually maintained gardens, the entire food forest is open to the public for harvest. These plantings provide healthy foods while protecting soil and water resources. Food forests are established in community green spaces and riparian areas. Volunteer groups are transforming public areas to Community Food Forests, maintained and utilized by local residents. Learn more about food forests, plants, designs and resources including the MN Harvester Handbook.

Experience Level: Beginner
Activity Level: Inactive

 

Toilet Paper or Tater Tots: Where Did the Forest Go?

9:45–10:45 am
Gallery 4
Angie Gupta

Today’s Minnesota forests look very different than they did a few centuries ago. This presentation will start by looking at the drivers of these changes, from the timber barons and early settlement all the way up to today’s federal land management policies. We will then explore how the decisions you make as consumers or property owners influence our forests. Does going paperless really save trees? Planting trees is good to mitigate climate change, but what about harvesting and using trees? The issues are complicated but you can make a difference! Learn what you can do to support healthy forests in Minnesota.

Experience Level: Beginner
Activity Level: Inactive